The Chance, the Playful and Spontaneous.

Already in her first works – delicate, transparent pictorial objects made out of paper – she set out on a way that would lead her ultimately to the current metal objects. Until today her work speaks of a stringent development, in which she stays true to herself also in her excursions to photography: starting with paper works, continuing with – sometimes colored – small metal objects she moved towards headhigh sculptures, curved and made of light aluminium and heavy bronze.

 

The tradition of the Bauhaus resonates in the bright colors and graphic shapes of her works. Her approach also reminds of the pictorial and formal language of the oeuvre of Kasimir Malewitsch and other constructivists. One object of 2004, for example, is titled “Thinking of Malewitsch”. Chance, the playful and spontaneity play a part in the creation of her works as well – like in the works of John Chamberlain, who uses leftovers from our throw-away society, objéts trouvés, to weld colored heavy metal sculptures.

 

The contradiction between planning and intuition, structure and deconstruction,even and curved surface, accurately applied color and decomposition accounts for the tension in and fascination with the works of Tatjana Busch.

Repeatedly, she breaks with her originally strictly reduced pictorial language in the course of the creation of her objects. She begins with stern graphic and geometrical shapes like the circle, the rectangle and the triangle. Then she bursts open these forms via alteration of the surface in the third dimension from which arise completely different, manifold shapes for the eye of the spectator, dependent on his perspective in the approach of the respective art work.

 

In the beginning there is exact planning and structuring concerning the size of the aluminium plates and their coloring. Then however, in the process of change, during the coloring according to the pleasure principle, after the curving of the form in its three-dimensional shape, the element of the spontaneous, the unplanned comes back into the process. This effect is especially amplified in works that she intentionally relinquishes to corrosion, the change through wind and weather, so that a very unique dynamic develops. Playfully, she confers geometrical shapes into flowing ones and deliberately allows for the principal of chance.

 

The interplay of ratio and emotion in the course of the creation of a work, and also colors, light, shaping and the right location are relevant for the respective object. The principle of the golden section and harmonious proportions are visible in her works. One of the canons of Bauhaus, of the scheme of proportion, the Modulor of le Corbusier, who refers back to the measurements of da Vinci respectively Vitruv, all this flows into her work intuitively.

 

Simply by accident she realized that there are analogies between the geometry of her objects and the pyramids of gizeh. The measurements of the perimeter of her original plates conform with the unity of the cubit. She intends to explore these connections between old wisdom and intuition more deeply and wishes her future work to be influenced by it more strongly.

 

Dr. Stephanie Staby, 2010 / Translation by Dr. Julia Samwer.

Already in her first works – delicate, transparent pictorial objects made out of paper – she set out on a way that would lead her ultimately to the current metal objects. Until today her work speaks of a stringent development, in which she stays true to herself also in her excursions to photography: starting with paper works, continuing with –

sometimes colored – small metal objects she moved towards headhigh sculptures, curved and made of light aluminium and heavy bronze.

 

The tradition of the Bauhaus resonates in the bright colors and graphic shapes of her works. Her approach also reminds of the pictorial and formal language of the oeuvre of Kasimir Malewitsch and other constructivists. One object of 2004, for example, is titled “Thinking of Malewitsch”. Chance, the playful and spontaneous play a part in the creation of her works as well – as in the works of John Chamberlain, who uses

leftovers from our throw-away society, objéts trouvés, to weld colored heavy metal

sculptures.

The contradiction between planning and intuition, structure and deconstruction, even and curved surface, accurately applied color and decomposition accounts for the tension in and fascination with the works of Tatjana Busch. Repeatedly, she breaks with her originally strictly reduced pictorial language in the course of the creation of her

objects. She begins with stern graphic and geometrical shapes like the circle, the rectangle and the triangle. Then she bursts open these forms via alteration of the

surface in the third dimension from which arise completely different, manifold shapes for the eye of the spectator, dependent on his perspective in the approach of the

respective art work.

In the beginning there is exact planning and structuring concerning the size of the

aluminium plates and their coloring. Then however, in the process of change, during the coloring according to the pleasure principle, after the curving of the form in its three-dimensional shape, the element of the spontaneous, the unplanned comes back into the process. This effect is especially amplified in works that she intentionally

relinquishes to corrosion, the change through wind and weather, so that a very unique dynamic develops. Playfully, she confers geometrical shapes into flowing ones and

deliberately allows for the principal of chance.

The interplay of ratio and emotion in the course of the creation of a work, and also colors, light, shaping and the right location are relevant for the respective object. The principle of the golden section and harmonious proportions are visible in her works. One of the canons of Bauhaus, of the scheme of proportion, the Modulor of le Corbusier, who refers back to the measurements of da Vinci respectively Vitruv, all this flows into her work intuitively.